Gotham Philosophical Society
July 29, 2016

The Ethical Costs of Upward Mobility

View the video of this event here.

It is well-known that upward mobility in the United States is increasingly rare. But what are the costs for those who do make it? Philosopher Jennifer M. Morton argues that one cost that is often overlooked is ethical. Moving up can require that in order to gain educational and career opportunities that will propel one into the middle-class one has to make difficult sacrifices in many areas of one’s life that one finds valuable—one’s relationships with family and friends, one’s sense of cultural identity, and one’s place in one’s community. These costs are ‘ethical’ because they affect aspects of one’s life that give it value and meaning. How should we think about these trade-offs? Are they inevitable? And how can we help those on this path contend with these ethical challenges? Join us for this important discussion.

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Jennifer M. Morton is an assistant professor of philosophy at the City College of New York and a senior fellow at the Center for Ethics and Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University and her A.B. from Princeton University. Professor Morton has published numerous journal articles in philosophy of action, moral philosophy, philosophy of education, and political philosophy. She is currently working on a book on the ethics of upward mobility.

Posted in: Video Archive
May 5, 2016

Religion in Democratic Politics

View the video of this event here.

What role should religious conviction play in democratic policy-making?  Features of modern democratic societies intersect to render this question both essential and problematic.  Government policy in a democracy is supposed to reflect the will of the citizens, and in those societies citizens are free to practice any religion that they choose. So why shouldn’t democratic laws be based on, say, the moral teachings of the Bible, if the majority of the citizens desire it?  Well, modern citizens often disagree about religion, both in terms of its truth and its relevance.  Does this fact of religious disagreement mean that each citizen should avoid voting on the basis of their own religious conviction, or would that make modern democracy objectionably secular, inconsistent with the religious freedom a democratic society  is supposed to secure?  In this talk, Robert Talisse explores these questions and defends the view that, indeed, religious citizens have a moral duty to avoid voting on the basis of their religious conviction, but that this constraint is not inconsistent with freedom of religion.

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Thursday, June 9 at 6pm. This event is part of the Philosophy Series at The Cornelia Street Café, located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319)

Robert B.Talisse is Jones Professor of Philosophy and Chairperson of the Philosophy Department at Vanderbilt University.  He specializes in political philosophy, democratic theory, and ethics.  He is the author of many scholarly essays and several books, including Democracy and Moral Conflict (Cambridge University Press, 2009) and, most recently, Engaging Political Philosophy (Routledge, 2016).  Talisse earned his PhD in Philosophy in 2001 from the City University of New York.

Posted in: Video Archive
April 8, 2016

Looking for Love (In All the Wrong Places)

View the video of this event here.

“All you need is love.” So sayeth the gospel of John (Lennon). But what is love? What sorts of things can be the object of our love? Do we love what we love in virtue of their qualities, in virtue of something else, or “just because.” How important is love? In recent years philosophers have addressed (or dodged) these questions. I’ll tell you something about what they’ve been saying and writing, but mostly I’ll be trying to get you to help me answer these questions.

Join philosopher Dale Jamieson in this collaborative investigation into the nature of love, that most essential and yet most intellectually elusive of human emotions.

Tuesday, May 17, at 6pm.  This event is part of the Philosophy Series at The Cornelia Street Café, located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319)

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Dale Jamieson is Chair of the Environmental Studies Department; Professor of Environmental Studies and of Philosophy; and the Founding Director of Environmental Studies and Animal Studies at New York University. He has written extensively on the environment, climate change, and our relationship to animals. He is the author of several works, including Reason in a Dark Time: Why the Struggle to Stop Climate Change Failed–and What It Means For Our Future and, most recently, Love in the Anthropocene (with Bonnie Nazdam).

Posted in: Video Archive
February 24, 2016

Infinite Hope as a Personal and Political Virtue

View the video of this event here.

One insight unites the political thought of Martin Luther King, the personal and political courage of such figures as Nelson Mandela and Viktor Frankl, and the global humanitarianism of Paul Farmer. It is the realization that hope—and in particular infinite hope—is essential to resilience in the face of adversity, effective resistance to injustice, and our capacity to promote “moral repair” of the world. Infinite hope is unshakeable confidence that even the worst malevolence and evil cannot extinguish all that is good in the world, or destroy the human capacity to do good. Join the philosopher Michele Moody-Adams as she helps us consider the moral and political implications of accepting that such hope is both a personal and a political virtue.

Tuesday, April 5 at 6pm. This event is part of the Philosophy Series at The Cornelia Street Café, located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319)

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Michele Moody-Adams is Joseph Straus Professor of Political Philosophy and Legal Theory at Columbia University, where she served as Dean of Columbia College and Vice President for Undergraduate Education from 2009-2011. Moody-Adams has published on such topics as equality and social justice, moral psychology and the virtues, and the philosophical implications of gender and race. Her current work includes articles on academic freedom, equal educational opportunity, and democratic disagreement.

Posted in: Video Archive
February 24, 2016

The Art in Living

View the video of this event here.

Will close attention to the beauty and ugliness of life make us better people? The philosopher David Kaspar believes it does, and that the unaesthetic life, like the unexamined one, is not worth living. Join us as Kaspar discusses how a good life includes not only acting rightly and choosing wisely, but living with style.

Wednesday, March 23, 6pm. This event is part of the Philosophy Series at The Cornelia Street Café, located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319)

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David Kaspar is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at St. John’s University. He works primarily in ethics and in social and political philosophy. His book Intuitionism was published in 2012.

Posted in: Video Archive
January 14, 2016

My Existential Valentine

Is Valentine’s Day an opportunity for meaningful celebrations of love, or is it merely a chocolate-covered con? As lovers, should we resist being seduced into spending billions of dollars annually on red roses and teddies (be they bears or lingerie)? Or should we surrender to the superficial satisfactions they represent? Be there as Skye Cleary takes us on an existential look at the hype and the possibilities for authentic loving. And bring someone you love.

Friday, February 12, 2016 at 6pm at The Cornelia Street Café, located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319).

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Skye Cleary, PhD is a philosopher and author of Existentialism and Romantic Love (Palgrave Macmillan, 2015). She lectures at Columbia University, Barnard College, the City University of New York, and the New York Public Library. Skye is a co-founder of the Manhattan Love Salon, an advisory board member of Strategy of Mind, an associate editor of the American Philosophical Association’s blog, and a certified fellow with the American Philosophical Practitioners Association. Skye has written for The Huffington Post, ABC Radio National, YourTango and others.

Posted in: Events, Past Events
November 24, 2015

Life Unfree: Meaning, Purpose, and Punishment Without Free Will

Free will is an illusion. Who we are and what we do is the result of factors beyond our control. So claim many philosophers and cognitive scientists, armed with empirical data and reasoned arguments. But their conclusion seems intolerable. Without freedom, in what sense are our lives and actions really ours? And if what we do isn’t under our control, how can we be held responsible for our doing it? What sense could we make of the idea of criminal justice? Is a life without free will a life worth living? Philosopher and free will skeptic Gregg D. Caruso thinks it is. Join us as he discusses how we, as individuals and a society, can make sense of life without free will.

Monday, January 11, 2016 at 6pm at The Cornelia Street Café, located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319).

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Gregg D. Caruso is an award winning Associate Professor of Philosophy at SUNY Corning and Co-Director of the Justice Without Retribution Network at the University of Aberdeen, Scotland. He is the author of Free Will and Consciousness: A Determinist Account of the Illusion of Free Will (2012), and the editor of Exploring the Illusion of Free Will and Moral Responsibility (ed., 2013), Science and Religion: 5 Questions (ed., 2014), and Neuroexistentialism: Meaning, Morals, and Purpose in the Age of Neuroscience (co-ed. w/Owen Flanagan, forthcoming). He is also the Founder and Editor-in-Chief of Science, Religion and Culture.

Posted in: Events, Past Events
September 4, 2015

Strange Bedfellows: Buddhism, Marxism, and the Critique of Contemporary Capitalist Culture

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image by eonupdate

 

View the video of this event here.

Please join us on Tuesday, October 20th at 6pm, at The Cornelia Street Caféas we welcome world-renowned philosopher and logician Graham Priest, as he discusses the surprising connections among Buddhist and Marxist critiques of the very conditions that both support our capitalist society and contribute significantly to the sort of suffering with which we have become all too familiar.

Priest, perhaps most well-known for his robust defense of the view that there are true contradictions, has long found fruitful ways of bringing his knowledge of Asian thought and practice to bear on questions that have defined philosophy’s European tradition.  His welcome cross-cultural understanding continues in this talk.

The Cornelia Street Café is located at 29 Cornelia Street, New York, NY 10014 (near Sixth Avenue and West 4th St.). Admission is $9, which includes the price of one drink. Reservations are recommended (212. 989.9319).

 

Posted in: Video Archive
March 17, 2015

Who Makes the Rules Around Here? A Workshop for Young Philosophers on the Origins of Morality

As children, we are groomed for society through the introduction of a system of rules, requirements, and directives that we are expected to internalize and then use to regulate our lives. But who says we have to live our lives this way rather than some other way?  God?  Other people?  And why should we listen anyway? Why can’t we each decide for ourselves how to live?  Join us for this philosophical workshop for young thinkers (grades 6-12), as we explore answers to these questions and more.  All you need to bring is your curiosity and your willingness to participate in and follow the discussion where it leads.

There is no required preparation or reading required, but those who want to get a head start on thinking about some of the issues we will discuss can read Plato’s short dialogue Euthyphro

When: Sunday, April 26 at 3pm

Where: Word Up: Community Bookshop – Liberia Comunitaria, 2113 Amsterdam Avenue (at the corner of 165th Street) New York, NY 10032 Tel (347) 688-4456

Cost: This event is free and open to the public, but there is limited space available. Please RSVP below.

Posted in: Events, Past Events
December 10, 2014

How to be an Atheist (and why you should): A conversation with Philip Kitcher

Please join us in conversation with Philip Kitcher as we discuss themes from his new book, Life after Faith.  While atheist writers gleefully cataloguing religion’s intellectual and moral vices have been numerous of late, too few have treated their target with the respect it deserves for successfully providing emotional comfort and social cohesion. Kitcher changes that, acknowledging religion’s virtues even as he constructs a secular humanist alternative to replace it.

Talk with him about this on Monday, February 23, 2015 at 7:00pm at Book Culture, 536 West 112th St., NY, NY  (212) 865-1588

This is event is free.

 

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Posted in: Events, Past Events